Understanding through Discussion


Welcome! You are not logged in. [ Login ]
EvC Forum active members: 63 (9094 total)
3 online now:
Newest Member: d3r31nz1g3
Post Volume: Total: 901,858 Year: 12,970/6,534 Month: 253/2,210 Week: 194/390 Day: 0/50 Hour: 0/2


Thread  Details

Email This Thread
Newer Topic | Older Topic
  
Author Topic:   Coffee House Musing - Webb, Hubble and Other Space Based Observatories
ringo
Member
Posts: 20492
From: frozen wasteland
Joined: 03-23-2005
Member Rating: 2.2


(1)
Message 16 of 25 (899962)
10-21-2022 12:51 PM
Reply to: Message 13 by Phat
10-21-2022 11:47 AM


Re: More religious crap
ringo writes:
R.I.P Ignorance
What you're really preaching is, "Viva ignorance!"
(I would love to point out the stupidity in your posts but I am trying to go off topic a little less often.)

"Oh no, They've gone and named my home St. Petersburg.
What's going on? Where are all the friends I had?
It's all wrong, I'm feeling lost like I just don't belong.
Give me back, give me back my Leningrad."
-- Leningrad Cowboys

This message is a reply to:
 Message 13 by Phat, posted 10-21-2022 11:47 AM Phat has seen this message but not replied

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 3698
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 3.2


(3)
Message 17 of 25 (899963)
10-21-2022 1:30 PM


NASA’s NEOWISE Space Telescope Takes 12-Year Time-Lapse Movie of Entire Sky
NASA’s NEOWISE Space Telescope Takes 12-Year Time-Lapse Movie of Entire Sky
quote:
NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer, or NEOWISE, spacecraft completes one trip halfway around the Sun every six months, taking images in all directions. Once stitched together, those images form an “all-sky” map showing the location and brightness of hundreds of millions of objects. Using 18 all-sky maps produced by the spacecraft (with the 19th and 20th to be released in March 2023), astronomers have constructed what is essentially a time-lapse movie of the sky, revealing changes that span a decade.
NEOWISE was originally a data processing project to retrieve asteroid detections and characteristics from WISE – an observatory launched in 2009 and tasked with scanning the entire sky to find and study objects outside our solar system. Cryogenically cooled detectors in the spacecraft were sensitive to infrared light.
Infrared light is not visible to the human eye. It is radiated by a plethora of cosmic objects, including cool, nearby stars and some of the most luminous galaxies in the universe. The WISE mission ended in 2011 after the onboard coolant – needed for some infrared observations – ran out, but the spacecraft and some of its infrared detectors were still functional. So in 2013, NASA repurposed it to track asteroids and other near-Earth objects, or NEOs. Both the mission and the spacecraft received a new name: NEOWISE.
Growing Wiser
Despite the mission shift, the infrared telescope has continued to scan the sky every six months. Astronomers have continued to use the data to study objects outside of our solar system.
For example, in 2020, researchers released the second iteration of a project called CatWISE: a catalog of objects from 12 NEOWISE all-sky maps. Astronomers use the catalog to study brown dwarfs, a population of objects found throughout the galaxy and lurking in the darkness close to our Sun. Although brown dwarfs form like stars, they don’t accumulate enough mass to kick-start fusion, the process that causes stars to shine.

Stop Tzar Vladimir the Condemned!

What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 3698
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 3.2


(2)
Message 18 of 25 (899966)
10-21-2022 1:41 PM


Results From NASA’s IXPE Help Unlock the Secrets of Famous Exploded Star
Surprising Results From NASA’s IXPE Help Unlock the Secrets of Famous Exploded Star
quote:
Using NASA’s Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE), astronomers have, for the first time, measured and mapped polarized X-rays from the remains of an exploded star. The findings come from observations of Cassiopeia A, a famous stellar remnant. The results shed new light on the nature of young supernova remnants, which accelerate particles close to the speed of light.
Launched on December 9, 2021, IXPE, a collaboration between NASA and the Italian Space Agency, is the first satellite that can measure the polarization of X-ray light with this level of sensitivity and clarity. It was designed to discover the secrets of some of the most extreme objects in the universe – the remnants of supernova explosions, powerful particle streams spit out by feeding black holes, and more.
All forms of light – from radio waves to gamma rays – can be polarized. Unlike the polarized sunglasses we use to cut the glare from sunlight bouncing off a wet road or windshield, IXPE’s detectors map the tracks of incoming X-ray light. Scientists can use these individual track records to figure out the polarization, which tells the story of what the X-rays went through.
Cassiopeia A (Cas A for short) was the first object IXPE observed after it began collecting data. One of the reasons Cas A was selected is that its shock waves – like a sonic boom generated by a jet – are some of the fastest in the Milky Way. The shock waves were generated by the supernova explosion that destroyed a massive star after it collapsed. Light from the blast swept past Earth more than three hundred years ago.
“Without IXPE, we have been missing crucial information about objects like Cas A,” said Pat Slane at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, who leads the IXPE investigations of supernova remnants. “This result is teaching us about a fundamental aspect of the debris from this exploded star – the behavior of its magnetic fields.”

Stop Tzar Vladimir the Condemned!

What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 3698
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 3.2


(2)
Message 19 of 25 (899968)
10-21-2022 1:53 PM


NASA’s Swift and Fermi Missions Detect Exceptional Cosmic Blast
Strange Long-Lasting Pulse of High-Energy Radiation Swept Over Earth
quote:
NASA’s Swift and Fermi Missions Detect Exceptional Cosmic Blast
An unusually bright and long-lasting pulse of high-energy radiation swept over Earth Sunday, October 9, captivating astronomers around the world. The intense emission came from a gamma-ray burst (GRB) – the most powerful class of explosions in the universe – that ranks among the most luminous events known.
A week ago, on Sunday morning Eastern time, a wave of X-rays and gamma rays passed through the solar system. It triggered detectors aboard NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, and Wind spacecraft, as well as others. Around the world, telescopes were turned to the site to study the aftermath, and new observations continue.
Called GRB 221009A, the explosion provided an unexpectedly exciting start to the 10th Fermi Symposium, a gathering of gamma-ray astronomers now underway in Johannesburg, South Africa. “It’s safe to say this meeting really kicked off with a bang – everyone’s talking about this,” said Judy Racusin, a Fermi deputy project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, who is attending the conference.
Originating from the direction of the constellation Sagitta, the signal traveled an estimated 1.9 billion years to reach Earth. Many astronomers believe it represents the birth cry of a new black hole, one that formed in the heart of a massive star collapsing under its own weight. In these circumstances, a developing black hole drives powerful jets of particles traveling near the speed of light. The energetic jets pierce through the star, emitting X-rays and gamma rays as they stream into space.
The burst also provided a long-awaited inaugural observing opportunity for a link between two experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) – NASA’s NICER X-ray telescope and a Japanese detector called the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Activated in April, the connection is dubbed the Orbiting High-energy Monitor Alert Network (OHMAN). It allows NICER to rapidly turn to outbursts detected by MAXI, actions that previously required intervention by scientists on the ground.
“OHMAN provided an automated alert that enabled NICER to follow up within three hours, as soon as the source became visible to the telescope,” said Zaven Arzoumanian, the NICER science lead at Goddard. “Future opportunities could result in response times of a few minutes.”

Stop Tzar Vladimir the Condemned!

What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


  
xongsmith
Member
Posts: 2339
From: massachusetts US
Joined: 01-01-2009
Member Rating: 3.4


(1)
Message 20 of 25 (899971)
10-21-2022 2:29 PM
Reply to: Message 15 by Theodoric
10-21-2022 12:23 PM


Re: Hubble and Webb Showcase the Pillars of Creation (Slider Tool)
Theodoric notes:
This slide look of the two images really points that out.
yes, and if you look at my picture in Message 317, together with Percy's posted JWST picture just above it in the old thread, you also see it clearly.

"I'm the Grim Reaper now, Mitch. Step aside."
Death to #TzarVladimirtheCondemned!
Enjoy every sandwich!

- xongsmith, 5.7dawkins scale


This message is a reply to:
 Message 15 by Theodoric, posted 10-21-2022 12:23 PM Theodoric has not replied

  
Taq
Member
Posts: 9088
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.4


(3)
Message 21 of 25 (900335)
10-26-2022 6:02 PM


Golden Age of Astronomy
I think we are a bit lucky to witness what seems like a golden age of astronomy. It's hard to imagine that we will see as great of a leap in technology in the future as we are seeing now. We seemed to have crossed this threshold in compute power and imaging technology that allowed us to make a big step forward. I suspect we will only see incremental changes from here on out, which is nothing to sneeze at, don't get me wrong. However, imaging the first black hole and first planet in another solar system can only happen once.
With JWST it feels a bit like the LHC. How much bigger do we have to go to get a significant improvement in observations, and is it worth it? The one exception I can think of would be gathering data on Earth sized planets which would need a big boost in resolution and sensitivity over the JWST.

  
Tanypteryx
Member
Posts: 3698
From: Oregon, USA
Joined: 08-27-2006
Member Rating: 3.2


(3)
Message 22 of 25 (902250)
11-20-2022 12:30 PM


Re: The Golden Age of Astronomy
The December issue of Scientific American has a large section on JWST. The observatory is producing some stunning images and it is interesting seeing comparison with Hubble images looking at different parts of the light spectrum. The JWST scientists are excited that they are seeing galaxies that are significantly older (further away) than those seen by any instrument before, but they are much larger and more luminous than expected and there are far more of them than expected.

Stop Tzar Vladimir the Condemned!

What if Eleanor Roosevelt had wings? -- Monty Python

One important characteristic of a theory is that is has survived repeated attempts to falsify it. Contrary to your understanding, all available evidence confirms it. --Subbie

If evolution is shown to be false, it will be at the hands of things that are true, not made up. --percy

The reason that we have the scientific method is because common sense isn't reliable. -- Taq


Replies to this message:
 Message 23 by Taq, posted 11-21-2022 10:45 AM Tanypteryx has not replied

  
Taq
Member
Posts: 9088
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.4


(2)
Message 23 of 25 (902271)
11-21-2022 10:45 AM
Reply to: Message 22 by Tanypteryx
11-20-2022 12:30 PM


Re: The Golden Age of Astronomy
Tanypteryx writes:
The JWST scientists are excited that they are seeing galaxies that are significantly older (further away) than those seen by any instrument before, but they are much larger and more luminous than expected and there are far more of them than expected.
Exciting times, indeed. There are few things as exciting in sciences as, "Well, that's odd". Astrophysicists now have a set of theories that they will need to adjust and improve.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 22 by Tanypteryx, posted 11-20-2022 12:30 PM Tanypteryx has not replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 24 by Theodoric, posted 11-21-2022 11:03 AM Taq has replied

  
Theodoric
Member
Posts: 7848
From: Northwest, WI, USA
Joined: 08-15-2005
Member Rating: 2.5


Message 24 of 25 (902277)
11-21-2022 11:03 AM
Reply to: Message 23 by Taq
11-21-2022 10:45 AM


Re: The Golden Age of Astronomy
And now fundies and creos will say that science sucks and can't be trusted. Now we have to explain all over again how science works.

What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence. -Christopher Hitchens

Facts don't lie or have an agenda. Facts are just facts

"God did it" is not an argument. It is an excuse for intellectual laziness.

If your viewpoint has merits and facts to back it up why would you have to lie?


This message is a reply to:
 Message 23 by Taq, posted 11-21-2022 10:45 AM Taq has replied

Replies to this message:
 Message 25 by Taq, posted 11-21-2022 11:05 AM Theodoric has not replied

  
Taq
Member
Posts: 9088
Joined: 03-06-2009
Member Rating: 3.4


(4)
Message 25 of 25 (902278)
11-21-2022 11:05 AM
Reply to: Message 24 by Theodoric
11-21-2022 11:03 AM


Re: The Golden Age of Astronomy
Theodoric writes:
And now fundies and creos will say that science sucks and can't be trusted.
Scientist: Why don't you trust scientists?
Fundie/creo: Because they are always changing their minds.
Scientist: What would make you trust scientists more?
Fundie/creo: If they changed their mind about creationism.

This message is a reply to:
 Message 24 by Theodoric, posted 11-21-2022 11:03 AM Theodoric has not replied

  
Newer Topic | Older Topic
Jump to:


Copyright 2001-2022 by EvC Forum, All Rights Reserved

™ Version 4.1
Innovative software from Qwixotic © 2022