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Author Topic:   Blood in dino bones
DogToDolphin
Member (Idle past 5954 days)
Posts: 40
From: Avignon, France
Joined: 02-11-2008


Message 121 of 138 (455307)
02-11-2008 8:32 PM
Reply to: Message 118 by RAZD
02-11-2008 8:04 PM


quote:
Then you can ask yourself which is more likely - that dragons existed, or that early people came upon the fossil skeletons of dinosaurs and made up myths to explain them.
That's plausible, and it makes sense.

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Rahvin
Member
Posts: 4046
Joined: 07-01-2005
Member Rating: 5.3


Message 122 of 138 (455309)
02-11-2008 8:42 PM
Reply to: Message 120 by DogToDolphin
02-11-2008 8:25 PM


Neither are horses, eagles, lions, or the other constituents of such mythological creatures globally resident (or at least were not until we humans brought them around the world).
Reptiles, on the other hand, exist nearly everywhere.
And the "dragons" of each culture are significantly different. They aren't a "worldwide myth" - many cultures simply have myths about large reptiles. The description of those creatures varies so wildly that you may as well also call a centaur and a minotaur the same thing as calling all of the reptiles dragons. They are named as such only due to the immediate reactions of other cultures noting the similarities - that they are all giant reptiles. THere really aren't any further similarities at all.
Ancient people exaggerated and compounded upon the real-life animals they saw around them, or heard about from traveler's tales. Stories were told, and exaggerated, and retold, until we have such fantastical creatures as gryphons and dragons. That's all.

When you know you're going to wake up in three days, dying is not a sacrifice. It's a painful inconvenience.

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RAZD
Member (Idle past 1482 days)
Posts: 20714
From: the other end of the sidewalk
Joined: 03-14-2004


Message 123 of 138 (455319)
02-11-2008 9:26 PM
Reply to: Message 120 by DogToDolphin
02-11-2008 8:25 PM


Griffins seem to be a mosaic of a kind of eagle and a lion,
Or a protoceratops -- with a beak and four clawed feet.
From the previous quote on the book mentioned:
quote:
... Striking similarities exist between the Protoceratops skeletons of the Gobi Desert and the legends of the gold-hoarding griffin told by nomadic people of the region, ...
The book is a fun read with a lot of information to tweak your imagination. She also explains cyclops with the skull and skeleton of a mastodon -- there is one large opening in the center of the skull (for the trunk) and the real eye sockets are hardly noticeable on the sides. The rest of the skeleton has enough homologies with humans that it can be arranged as a giant biped.
Enjoy.

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DogToDolphin
Member (Idle past 5954 days)
Posts: 40
From: Avignon, France
Joined: 02-11-2008


Message 124 of 138 (455322)
02-11-2008 9:31 PM
Reply to: Message 122 by Rahvin
02-11-2008 8:42 PM


what about the Oarfish? Even thought it is not a "dragon", it still looks like an ancient mythological creature, doesn't it?
Oarfish - Wikipedia
Giant Oarfish

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 Message 126 by Dr Adequate, posted 02-11-2008 9:56 PM DogToDolphin has replied

  
AdminNosy
Administrator
Posts: 4754
From: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Joined: 11-11-2003


Message 125 of 138 (455323)
02-11-2008 9:37 PM


Dino Blood is the topic!
Focus on that or start another thread please.

  
Dr Adequate
Member (Idle past 362 days)
Posts: 16113
Joined: 07-20-2006


Message 126 of 138 (455330)
02-11-2008 9:56 PM
Reply to: Message 124 by DogToDolphin
02-11-2008 9:31 PM


what about the Oarfish? Even thought it is not a "dragon", it still looks like an ancient mythological creature, doesn't it?
Or, to put it another way, there is evidence of oarfish existing, and oarfish do actually exist.
And your point would be what? We evolutionists have no problem whatsoever with saying that things that exist exist. In order to argue against evolution, you need to say something that is false. The existence of oarfish is true.

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Dr Adequate
Member (Idle past 362 days)
Posts: 16113
Joined: 07-20-2006


Message 127 of 138 (455332)
02-11-2008 9:59 PM
Reply to: Message 119 by DogToDolphin
02-11-2008 8:17 PM


Why are you saying I live in a Fantasy world?
Because you are a creationist.
What about it?
It is a dinosaur fossil that actually exists. How do you suppose that that will help you?

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DogToDolphin
Member (Idle past 5954 days)
Posts: 40
From: Avignon, France
Joined: 02-11-2008


Message 128 of 138 (455380)
02-12-2008 9:13 AM
Reply to: Message 126 by Dr Adequate
02-11-2008 9:56 PM


What makes you think I was arguing against evolution?
I don't have necessarily a point to draw.
It seems you have all the answers about life, good for you!
I can't say the same.
But if you don't want to contribute to discussions, why waste your time to reply? You draw wrong conclusions from my motives and what I am writing. So nobody gains anything from your replies, and I certainly don't see the point of your replies.
It also seems to me that you want to "win" the discussion at all cost.
This is my last reply to your ad-hominem attacks, since it's not worth my time, it's not even like you're bringing evidences or arguments.
Now about the Oarfish, maybe for you it's old news, but I think most people have never heard/seen such a creature, like myself actually. It does look like some ancient Chinese representation of "dragons" without legs though. Does it mean anything, does that prove anything, of course no. How can we know for sure. Those are just interesting things to discuss. But then I'm not gonna spend my life on the subject.
Anyway, don't feel like you have to come in and spell your curses to me, you will do more harm to your credibility.

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New Cat's Eye
Inactive Member


Message 129 of 138 (455475)
02-12-2008 2:32 PM
Reply to: Message 128 by DogToDolphin
02-12-2008 9:13 AM


Hi DogToDolphin,
Don't mind the "attacks" from the others.
They seem to be being a little harsh on you.
You seem to want to discuss some things you find interesting.
A lot of times, we'll get creationists comming in here and make wild claims about evolution using the same example you have brought.
I think people were jumping to conlcusions about what you intended.
Just don't make explicit claims that are false and you'll be fine. It also helpes to have thick skin.
Welcome to EvC.

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Creationista
Inactive Junior Member


Message 130 of 138 (455489)
02-12-2008 3:35 PM
Reply to: Message 123 by RAZD
02-11-2008 9:26 PM


"Or a protoceratops -- with a beak and four clawed feet."
...
"She also explains cyclops with the skull and skeleton of a mastodon"
So did people find the skeletons and make the stories of interaction up, or did they have experiences with similar creatures and misremember the animal in their experience with the creature they thought the bones made? Or is there another explanation?

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Admin
Director
Posts: 13081
From: EvC Forum
Joined: 06-14-2002
Member Rating: 2.4


Message 131 of 138 (455492)
02-12-2008 3:47 PM


Topic Reminder
Seems like in a thread titled Blood in dino bones that the posts would be at least somewhat about blood in dinosaur bones. Can someone tie the current discussion back into the topic?

--Percy
EvC Forum Director

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DogToDolphin
Member (Idle past 5954 days)
Posts: 40
From: Avignon, France
Joined: 02-11-2008


Message 132 of 138 (456296)
02-16-2008 9:32 PM
Reply to: Message 131 by Admin
02-12-2008 3:47 PM


Dino Blood In Video
Here is a video I found on Google, worth watching, it's 13minutes long only, and has Mary Schweitzer interviewed and others.

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Replies to this message:
 Message 133 by Percy, posted 02-18-2008 8:28 AM DogToDolphin has replied
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Percy
Member
Posts: 22606
From: New Hampshire
Joined: 12-23-2000
Member Rating: 4.9


Message 133 of 138 (456465)
02-18-2008 8:28 AM
Reply to: Message 132 by DogToDolphin
02-16-2008 9:32 PM


Re: Dino Blood In Video
This is an unbelievably informative video. It addresses and answers all the questions that have been raised so far in this topic. Would you be willing to summarize its key points and information? I was absolutely fascinated and watched it from beginning to end, but it might be asking a bit much that everyone watch it, particularly as the Forum Guidelines request that people make their points in their own words. No good deed goes unpunished, sorry.
--Percy

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 Message 132 by DogToDolphin, posted 02-16-2008 9:32 PM DogToDolphin has replied

Replies to this message:
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Zucadragon
Member
Posts: 91
From: Netherlands
Joined: 06-28-2006
Member Rating: 2.9


Message 134 of 138 (456499)
02-18-2008 11:12 AM
Reply to: Message 132 by DogToDolphin
02-16-2008 9:32 PM


Re: Dino Blood In Video
I would indeed ask for an actual written post as to what you find the most convincing arguments and info in this video.
I've seen the whole thing and I have to say it is quite interesting, but reading up on it I think discussing the points you think are the best is more fun then me trying to tackle the whole video in one go.
Edited by Zucadragon, : typo demon got his butt kicked

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DogToDolphin
Member (Idle past 5954 days)
Posts: 40
From: Avignon, France
Joined: 02-11-2008


Message 135 of 138 (456510)
02-18-2008 12:25 PM
Reply to: Message 133 by Percy
02-18-2008 8:28 AM


Re: Dino Blood In Video
Ok guys, here are some notes I took while watching the video again:
Basically fossilized bones cannot tell us whether Dinos were warm-blooded/cold-blooded, how different they were from reptiles...
The video interviews a married couple the wife Christy Corey Rogers cuts bones and examine patterns that was once living tissues and her husband Ray Rogers is a geologist.
The interviewer describes their job as a kind of CSI of the past, which is rather true since the couple are able to identify pathologies and diseases.
Their predilection site of excavation is Madagascar where a kind of Dinos graveyard covers the ground. Those bones look white and are light compared to regular fossils filled with mineral.
Those bones might have been preserved because of the clay rich rock it is entombed in. They are not infested with manganese and other minerals. They look like bleached cow bones.
They went to see Mary Schweitzer who found in Montana the biggest T-Rex ever. And she is the first one to have discovered red blood cells. She was intrigued by the hollowness of a bone and that led her to analyze a section of the bone under microscope. No one could believe her find at first since the laws of decay wouldn't preserve such delicate structures after millions of years.
She also put some bones in acid, and then she asked her assistant to analyze the remains, and the assistant described (as shown in the video) tissues that she could extend and flex. Mary ran subsequent tests to make sure.
It is too early to reveal anything yet about how Dinos died or if we can get full DNA.
Anyway these finds open a door for fossil studies that no one could have dreamed of 10 years ago.
I hope more research will be done on other fossils, not only Dinos but maybe other organisms.
Anybody knows about that Madagascar Dino Graveyard, I'd be interested to see pictures.
Edited by DogToDolphin, : No reason given.

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